Articles contributed from various sources...

Ah, dear James. He does try hard but since this website is called Second Referendum, we thought we couldn't let paragraph 5 slip by.

 

It reads: A second referendum would take up to a year to legislate for during which time there would be no certainty over our future relationship with the EU. The result would, like the last time, not be in itself legally binding and so Parliament would have to interpret the result which would, again, bring all the same challenges as we've got right now.

  • A second referendum would take up to a year to legislate for - I'm not sure where this timescale comes from but perhaps with a lot  of proroguing of parliament it might well be the case. But even if it is, democracy is not a time limited process.
  • during which time there would be no certainty over our future relationship with the EU. - As if that's a problem. We've had three years of uncertainty and to add another third to that time would not be an issue.
  • The result would, like the last time, not be in itself legally binding - This is the humdinger. Just let me summarise: THE LAST REFERENDUM WAS NOT LEGALLY BINDING. That's because the house chose to leave out the bit that would make it legally binging. It could have added such a clause but had it done so it would most likely have added the requirement for some kind of super-majority,  too: something like 75% of the vote or 60% of all the electorate. As it happened, the vote was merely advisory. For MPs to talk about the "mandate of the British people", etc is disingenuous at best. The only imperative to implementing Brexit is based on the parties' manifestos. And let's be sure: those manifestos ruled out No-deal Brexit. A second referendum could be made legally binding.
  • and so Parliament would have to interpret the result which would, again, bring all the same challenges as we've got right now. - Not if the result happened to be remain! JRM said that a second referendum was not a good idea because it would overturn the result of the first referendum. That, and all opinion polls, point to the public wanting to remain.

 

Dear James,

Please don't try to pull the wool over our eyes. We hope the above helps.

yours

 

The Second Referendum Team

James Heappey MP

House of Commons

London
SW1A 0AA

6 Mar 2019

Brexit - a Last Chance

Dear Mr Heappey,

It seems that the votes in parliament next week are the last chance for members to vote for what is best for the future of the country.

I know you have felt that you must obey the orders of your constituency; no matter how ill-informed they were, how narrow the margin in Wells and ignoring the possibility that some might just have changed their minds in the last two years.

Please cast your votes in the coming week so as to be seen against all forms of leaving the European Union. Do this, not against your party, not against your constituency but for your country and for your ability to look your children in the eye and explain you gave them the chance to live and love in Europe.

yours sincerely,

a letter to the Prime Minister

Theresa May MP

Prime Minister

House of Commons
London
SW1A 0AA

3 Feb 2019

What are you up to?

Dear Prime Minister,

Let me get this straight. The referendum was advisory and won on a slender margin.

You think it is best  to remain in Europe

"I believe it is clearly in our national interest to remain a member of the European Union." Theresa May, 25th April 2016

Parliament wishes to remain in Europe

 All pretty obvious - but the latest is "You've got a Leave population and a Remain parliament." Liam Fox, 20th January 2019

 The people wish to remain in Europe.

 56% of those who expressed an opinion would vote remain in a second referendum. YouGov poll, 16th January 2019

 I don't believe it's beyond doubt that The Queen wishes to remain.

That hat at the opening of parliament…

And yet you pursue a plan that by all accounts will be disastrous for jobs, national security and certainly be of no benefit to the conservative party.

What the hell are you up to?

Yours, etc

a letter to my MP and all leaders of political parties

James Heappey MP

House of Commons

London
SW1A 0A

31 Jan 2019

Serving the Nation

I have a proposal. It's fairly radical but I urge you to read the letter in full before throwing it in the anti-Brexit pile for processing "later".

Brexit issues are taking up a lot of parliamentary time. I sense your frustration at not being able to progress other matters that impinge more directly on the constituents you were elected to represent and serve.

Cutting to the chase, my proposal is cancel Brexit.

Now that all leaders are talking, I propose that the government and all parties acknowledge that Brexit - and the time and money it is taking to implement it - is not in the nation's interest: threats to trade, the Union, food security and many other risks have been thoroughly voiced. I propose that, with the agreement of all parties, the government cancels Article 50. A further concord might be that all leaders could agree to leave Brexit politicising and campaigning until the next General Election.

An important point on voter perception: one might argue that to revoke Article 50 and cancel the whole Brexit fiasco would doubtless upset the 52% of voters who voted to leave. However, in a YouGov poll of 16th January 2019 it is reported that the leave intention is now 44%. The percentage of the population who would feel outrage at the revocation of Article 50 is now falling. The specific figures for your constituency are not known to me. The point is that the government would be alienating a minority of voters by remaining in the European union.

In the referendum campaign, you were a remainer (correct me if I'm wrong), Theresa May campaigned to remain and your party's manifesto of 2015 stated "We say yes to a family of nation states, all part of a European Union." The Labour Party, Liberal Democrats, SNP and the wider groupings of Northern Ireland and Scotland were also pro-remain.

You will see that I have copied this letter to many others in the hope that it might spark a conversation between those referenced. I feel it's time to put a quick stop to this madness in a way that will cause no material harm to the nation by crashing out of Europe but still leave the door open to leaving the European Union by the more conventional method of implementing policy in a party's manifesto after a General Election

I urge you to give this serious thought and discuss it with your fellow members of parliament.

Yours, etc

 

cc:
Rt Hon Theresa May, Prime Minister and leader Conservative Party
Rt Hon Jeremy Corbyn, leader Labour Party
Rt Hon Sir Vince Cable, leader, Liberal Democrats
Rt Hon Ian Blackford, leader SNP
Rt Hon Nigel Dodds, leader DUP
Caroline Lucas, leader Green Party
Liz Saville Roberts, leader Plaid Cymru

- - - - - - -

A quick update:
three weeks later only one person has replied. Thank you Caroline Lucas.